Canadian Resources

Canadian Resources   https://drive.google.com/file/d/17I0LVyJ9A67XAILtBSP67bGWB2n5q4iW/view?usp=sharing
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The Canadian Jewish Review was founded in 1921 in Toronto by George and Florence Freedlander. Published in the English language, in many ways its development follows the trajectory of English-speaking Canadian Jews. Its approach was politically mild, moderately Zionist, religiously Reform, and focused on the social achievements of local Jewry rather than on current events. The tide began to turn as events heated up in British-Mandate Palestine, particularly the 1929 attacks on Jews in Hebron; the coming of Nazism in Europe forced world consciousness upon even the most devoutly assimilationist Jewish journalists. Its long run during the years of greatest upheaval and change in the lives of its readers makes it a central source for the study of Canada’s Jews. The selection digitized here runs from 1921 to 1966, with some years missing and other years lacking issues. http://newspapers.lib.sfu.ca/mcc-cjr-collection
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Many immigrants came to Canada through the Port of Halifax. Pier 21 was the entry point after 1921. The Pier 21 Museum in Halifax is a very interesting visit for researchers. They have a website that offers valuable information re ship schedules and arrivals. Ship's manifests can also be accessed. For passenger ships arriving in the late 19th century and the first part of the 20th century one would have to check with their local public library in Canada to see if they have microfiche records of ship arrivals and manifests. A researcher would have to have some idea when their family members may have arrived in Canada. Halifax was not the only port of entry. Montreal, Quebec City, St.John New Brunswick were also destination ports. Some immigrants even landed in St. John's Newfoundland and then entered Canada from there (Newfoundland did not join Canada until 1949). Many Canadian immigrants arrived in New York and other U.S. ports and then joined family in Canada. Ellis Island is also a very good starting point for researchers.
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Ontario

If your family member came through the Province of Ontario a primary source for researchers is the Ontario Archives. Toronto was the preferred destination for many immigrants, therefore searching the City of Toronto Archives is a key resource. https://jgstoronto.ca/research_resources/ontario-archives/
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Housed in the Lipa Green Centre of the Jewish Federation of Ontario, the Jewish Archives is a vast repository of vital information. One can find landsmanshaften publications and records, shul memberships, Society magazines, histories of Mount Sinai, Brunswick St., Baycrest Hospitals, newspaper and magazine articles that related to well-known Jewish personalities, digests of Jewish businesses etc. The Archives are digitizing, and much is now available online.
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Toronto

City of Toronto Archives is a good starting point for anyone searching their family who may have settled here or passed through.   https://www.toronto.ca/city-government/accountability-operations-customer-service/access-city-information-or-records/city-of-toronto-archives/
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https://jgstoronto.ca/resources/rotenberg-ledger-inserts/ Link to Rotenberg Ledger The Rotenberg Ledger are turn of the 20th century records of passengers who had their steamship tickets purchased by relations in Toronto. A large percentage of the names that are recorded in this Steamship Agent's books are Jewish.
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Toronto Resources including JGS Toronto Library Collection, Cemeteries, Funeral Homes https://drive.google.com/file/d/10V-26ScE_cJixtlolzC17RfcaB63o9Gu/view?usp=sharing
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